01 9 / 2012

How much real estate math do you need to know if you are investing in real estate? There are computers and calculators for calculating interest rates or amortizing loans. What you need to know is a few simple formulas for determining if a property is a good investment or not.

The Real Estate Math You Don’t Need

The gross rent multiplier is one formula you don’t need. I bring it up because people are sometimes still using it, and there are better ways to estimate value. A gross rent multiplier is a crude way to put a value on a property. You decide that properties are worth 10 times annual rent or less, for example, and simply multiply the gross annual rent a building collects by ten to get your value.

There are obvious problems with this formula. You need to constantly change it to reflect interest rates, because a property might be profitable at 12 times rent when interest rates are low, but a money loser at eight times rent if the financing is expensive. Also, there are just plain different expenses for different properties, especially when some include utilities in the rent, for example. Gross rent doesn’t say much about the factor that makes a property valuable: the net income.

Real Estate Math You Need

Rental properties are bought for the income they produce, so this is what your real estate valuation should be based on. That is why your real estate math education needs to start with the how to use a capitalization rate, or “cap rate” to determine value. A cap rate is the rate of return expected by investors in a given area, or the rate of return on a property at a given price. 

An example might make this clear. Take the gross income of a property and subtract all expenses, but not the loan payments. If the gross income is $76,000 per year, and the expenses are $32,000, you have net income before debt-service of $44,000. Now, to arrive at an estimate of value, you simply apply the capitalization rate to this figure.

If the normal capitalization rate is .10 (ask a real estate professional what is normal in your area), meaning investors expect a 10% return on the value of their investment, you would  divide the net income of $44,000 by .10. You get $440,000 - the estimated value of the building. If the common rate is .08, meaning investors in the area expect only an 8% return, the value would be $550,000.

Simple Real Estate Math

Estimated value equals net income before debt-service divided by cap rate - this really is simple real estate math, but the tough part is getting accurate income figures. Is the seller is showing you ALL the normal expenses, and not exaggerating income? If he stopped repairing things for a year, and is showing “projected” rents, instead of actual rents collected, the income figure could be $15,000 too high. That would mean you would estimate the value at $187,000 more (.08 cap rate).

Besides verifying the figures, smart investors sometimes separate out income from vending machines and laundry machines. Suppose these sources provide $6,000 of the income. That would add $75,000 to the appraised value (.08 cap rate). Instead, you can do the appraisal without this income included, then add back the replacement cost of the machines (probably much less than $75,000).

No real estate formula is perfect, and all are only as good as the figures you plug into them. Used carefully, though, real estate appraisal using capitalization rates is the most accurate method for estimating the value of income properties. For putting a value on a single family home, you need another approach. Yes this means more real estate math to learn, but we’ll save that for another time.

Lisa Jones is a seasoned realtor affiliated with RE/MAX Bryan-College Station. She offers a one-stop source for real estate services and information about Bryan-College Station Real Estate. Visit her homepage for a complete list of real properties college station, and you just might find the home you have been dreaming to have.

30 8 / 2012

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The single biggest question I get from people getting started in real estate(and experienced for that matter) is “how to find deals?” They say, “I don’t know what to focus on in real estate. Should I focus on rehabbing? Should I focus on finding absentee owners? Should I focus on direct mail?”

The problem with those questions is that the real estate investor is confused about the whole business of real estate and the marketing plan behind finding the deals.  I understand that you go to a three-day real estate training, or you buy a home-study course, and every angle of real estate investing is attractive. You can see the potential in all these different markets. 

First things first, you have to get focused! This is the only way to get good at overcoming objections and solving problems unique to different types of motivated seller markets. 

Let’s simplify this whole real estate marketing game and boil it down to this:

Who, What, When, Where, Why & How (And How Much)!

Who:

Who is that we are going to be talking to? Who is that we are going to be trying to purchase homes from? You may want to work in one or two of the following markets: foreclosures, absentee owners, our probates, divorces, for sale by owners, tired landlords. This is your market – the who. 

What:

What are you going to say in your marketing? This may be a real estate marketing script that you follow, a direct mail postcard system that you roll out, or specific copy in your advertisement. Understand, that you are looking for motivated sellers to take action. If you’re taking the time to write a letter, place an ad, etc you want your prospect to do something like call you or email you or listen to a recorded message! 

When:

When are your prospects going to receive your marketing message? Timing and consistency is everything to your real estate marketing campaign. You need to be the single person (or company) they think of when the moment strikes at which they realize they are, in fact, a motivated seller! 

Where:

Where are they going to receive your message? Obviously if you’re door knocking, you’ll meet them at their home. But if you are marketing to personal representatives of an estate, the attorney may receive the letter and pass it on. It’s important to think about where your potential seller is going to “see” your message because this will affect the action they take.

Why:

This is where your real estate investing exit strategy comes into play. What are you going to do with the property once you’ve gained control? Are you going to wholesale it to another investor? Are you going to fix it up and flip it yourself? Are you going to hold on to it for rental?

As you grow into your real estate business, you’ll have a number of options for each deal depending on what’s most suitable for the piece of real estate. You may have properties that you can assign, rehab OR rent. But, initially, decide where you are on your real estate investing scale and work within those parameters. If you are asking: “Should I focus on rehabbing houses or should I target probate?” you’re asking two different questions.

How:

The next thing is the communication method. That is ‘how are we going to talk to our potential motivated sellers?’ So let’s suppose your market is foreclosures or pre-foreclosures (the who). The next question is how? There are basically only four methods that we can use to communicate with our target market.

1. Driving for Dollars (or door knocking)

2. Telemarketing

3. Direct mail

4. Mass marketing

How Much:

I toss this in because this is going to affect your real estate marketing strategies. How much can you afford to spend? Understand for a few dollars a day, you can have an extremely profitable real estate investing business. It doesn’t take a lot of money to bring in home run deals! 

Here’s a quick real estate marketing business plan that you can implement immediately using the Who, What, When, Where, Why & How approach:

Who: Pre-foreclosures within 2 weeks of sale at the courthouse (note how specific this is)

What: Yellow legal pad letters

When: Two weeks prior to the sale

Where: Prospect’s Home

Why: Seller is more motivated and has run out of options

How: Hand-written, hand addressed, first class postage and return address label

How Much: Based on a budget of $100/month, I will send 59.5 letters each week (remember to figure out your marketing budget down to the penny – stamps, ink, paper, envelopes, etc.)

And there you have it! 7 Simple Steps for your real estate marketing plan.

  Lisa Jones is a seasoned realtor affiliated with RE/MAX Bryan-College Station. She offers a one-stop source for real estate services and information about Bryan-College Station Real Estate. Visit her homepage for a complete list of real properties college station, and you just might find the home you have been dreaming to have.

 

 

29 8 / 2012

Start your real estate market research with the U.S. Census information about a town. You want to invest in a town that is growing, especially if you are investing in income properties. It’s getting easier to do this now, with all the information available online. Just go to the official U.S. Census site at www.census.gov.

If you call the chamber of commerce, or the local department of economic development, they may have a packet of statisics they can send you too, showing population figures, employment mix, and more. These are a couple of the statistical tools and information that can help, but one of the easiest and most useful research tools, is talking. 

Real Estate Market Research - Choosing a City

Talking is a great way to research a town. I once called the  Chamber of Commerce of Deming, New Mexico. In the course of our conversation, the chairman casually commented that the city was using up the water faster than the aquifer was being replenished. I also learned that they had no back-up plan. That was enough to cross Deming off our list.

When you want to know more about a town, use the phone. Use any excuse to call anyone from a real estate agent to a random resident. Ask questions about crime, whether the local government welcomes new businesses, what the climate is like. Are houses sitting for sale for a long time, or do they go fast? Where are the good and bad areas? What are the good and bad things about the town?

Prior to moving to Tucson, Arizona, part of our real estate market research was to call people in potential towns to see if they owned a snow shovel. If they did, we crossed the town off the list. Two different places can both get 25 inches of snow per year, but in one it stays all winter, and in another it melts before noon. Our snow shovel question told us the truth behind the statistics.

That was just a personal thing with us, of course, but talking to people can tell you much that is more directly related to investing. In fact, a good local bar can be a great place to do your research once you are in a town. Patrons will tell you what big employers are about to move in or out of the town, how fast homes are selling, whether there are gangs, and much more. 

Ask which areas are improving, and which are getting worse. Listen for stories about noisy or animal-infested areas. This kind of information is important, but hard to get from the raw data. Of course, people do sometimes exaggerate, so try to verify what you hear. Still, talking to people of can be a great way to do real estate market research.

Lisa Jones is a seasoned realtor affiliated with RE/MAX Bryan-College Station. She offers a one-stop source for real estate services and information about Bryan-College Station Real Estate. Visit her homepage for a complete list of real properties college station, and you just might find the home you have been dreaming to have.

 

 

26 8 / 2012

You want to know whether the market is strong if you are buying or selling real estate. Having such information lets you know how flexible you need to be in offers.

Sales have slowed for large parts of the east and west coasts for sellers. Good news for buyers there. On the other hand, sales are picking up in parts of the interior of our country. A cheerful note for sellers. Let’s look at what is happening, why and what it means to you.

A lot of things affect market strength, but some more than others. Is employment strong in your area? Are there jobs available that pay well? Plentiful jobs that pay well help to strengthen the real estate market.

Is there a high inventory of newly built, but unsold, housing in your area? Has this inventory been increasing or decreasing? Sales tend to slow and prices decrease when  inventory is very high. This often happens when prices have moved above what average families in an area can afford.

Where Home Inventories Are High 

In Washington, D.C., Miami, Florida, and Phoenix, Arizona inventories of new unsold housing have increased greatly in the last twelve months. Those markets tend to be better for buyers than in the recent past.

Where Home Inventories Are Low 

In Texas, Dallas and Houston have very low housing inventory increases and a good employment picture. Prices are increasing there. Families are buying homes. Investors are scouting out the area and buying, too. This has created a situation that is very helpful to sellers, which is somewhat ironic given that Texas generally missed out on the housing boom of the last six years. 

What’s Going On In Your Market 

How do you figure out what the market is like in your area? Read the local news paper. Are there “price reduced” or “buy now before the next price increase” phrases in ads for homes being sold? Are there stories about lay-offs or about new employers coming to town? Call your local builders’ association, realtors’ association, Chamber of Commerce. Ask lots of questions about the number of unsold houses today as compared with the number a year ago. Ask the Chamber of Commerce about employers coming to town or leaving. Visit models in new communities and ask lots of questions there, too.

You will soon have your own opinion about what is going on in the part of the country in which you want to buy or sell. Your strategy needs to be adjusted to the strength of your position as a buyer or seller. Understanding the market you will be dealing in is a good place to start.

Contact Lisa Jones and get a better understanding of how your property can benefit from above.

26 8 / 2012

Three months ago, the “Current Market Conditions” survey showed that overall the U.S. housing market was displaying a rare balance between buyer demand and seller supply for the first time in eight years. The latest quarterly survey shows that equilibrium has been achieved —  41% of real estate agents said more buyers than sellers; 40% said there were more sellers than buyers, and 19% reported a 50-50 balance.  

Most notable exceptions are in the Northeast, Chicago metro area, and in the Western states. (See Second Quarter chart.) Home buyers outnumber sellers by considerable margins in Chicago and the West, while sellers outnumber buyers in the Northeast.  

Additional proof of a balanced nationwide housing market between buyers and sellers was reported by the National Association of Realtors, which estimated a 6.5 month supply of unsold homes in its May report. An inventory  supply of  5.5 to 6.0 months is considered balanced. 

The second quarter national survey also found:

Fifty-six percent of real estate agents said it is now on average, taking more than 60 days from listing to contract to sell a house. This is up from 55% in the first quarter and 35% a year ago.  Twenty- eight percent said it is taking more than 90 days to contract.  Only 15% of existing homes for sale are selling in 30 days or less.  

Housing inventories are continuing to increase:  86% now report a good supply of homes in virtually all price ranges. This is up from 81% in the first quarter and  38% a year ago.

Sixty-six percent of member agents reported that annual home price appreciation is now five percent or less. This is down from 8-10% a year ago. Home price appreciation of more than 10% is now 16%, on average.

The percentage of home sellers getting 95% or more of asking prices  is currently 68%, compared to 90% a year ago. Three months ago it was 75%.

Multiple offers from home buyers are also down substantially. Currently,  the estimate is 32%.  It was  39% in the first quarter and 70% a year ago.

First-time buyers still account for one of three homes for sale nationally. Repeat and move-up buyers are most active in higher priced real estate markets.   Recent home price appreciation and rising mortgage rates & interest rates have had only a minimal negative effect on first-time buyers, on average. Exceptions are marginal qualifiers.

“We welcome a balanced, more orderly marketplace for both the consumer and real estate professionals,” said Michael Bearden, president and CEO of HouseHunt, Inc. “Double-digit price appreciation is simply not sustainable for a multi-year period and will eventually drive away entry level buyers.“ 

Second Quarter Current Market Conditions Survey:   Regional Results 

 U.S.   South  Midwest    Northeast    West     California*     Chicago*

More Buyers

 41%    40%     49%         30%          47%       39%              50%     

More Sellers

 40%    44%     30%         50%          34%       41%              19%

50-50

 19%    16%     21%         20%           19%        20%            31%

Time on Market:

0-60 days

 44%   35%     31%         48%           49%        49%              35%

More than 60 days

 56%    65%     69%         51%       51%        51%              65%

Sale vs. Ask Price:

90-95%

 35%    35%     29%         37%       26%        29%              34%

95% -100% Plus

 65%    65%     71%         63%          74%        71%              66%

Annual Apprec.:

5% or less

 66%     57%     70%       73%       65%     75%          61%

5-10%

 18%    30%       20%       19%         15%      11%              31%

More than 10%

 16%    13%       10%         8%       20%       14%            8%

Inventory:

Good Supply

 86%     86%     90%        96%      83%       90%           92%

Limited Supply

 14%     14%     10%          4%     17%       10%            8%

Multiple offers:

Yes 

 32%     35%     33%          34%      32%      18%           55%

No

68%      65%     67%         66%       68%      82%           45%

Activity:

First Time Buyers

 33%     34%      41%         47%       42%       44%           35%

Move-Up & Repeat

 67%    66%      59%        53%      58%       56%            65%

*California survey percentages are included in both U.S. and West  results.

**Chicago Metro survey percentages are included in both .U.S. and Midwest results.

Lisa Jones is a seasoned realtor affiliated with RE/MAX Bryan-College Station. She offers a one-stop source for real estate services and information about Bryan-College Station Real Estate. Visit her homepage for a complete list of real properties college station, and you just might find the home you have been dreaming to have.

24 8 / 2012

You want to know whether the market is strong if you are buying or selling real estate. Having such information lets you know how flexible you need to be in offers.

Sales have slowed for large parts of the east and west coasts for sellers. Good news for buyers there. On the other hand, sales are picking up in parts of the interior of our country. A cheerful note for sellers. Let’s look at what is happening, why and what it means to you.

A lot of things affect market strength, but some more than others. Is employment strong in your area? Are there jobs available that pay well? Plentiful jobs that pay well help to strengthen the real estate market.

Is there a high inventory of newly built, but unsold, housing in your area? Has this inventory been increasing or decreasing? Sales tend to slow and prices decrease when  inventory is very high. This often happens when prices have moved above what average families in an area can afford.

Where Home Inventories Are High 

In Washington, D.C., Miami, Florida, and Phoenix, Arizona inventories of new unsold housing have increased greatly in the last twelve months. Those markets tend to be better for buyers than in the recent past.

Where Home Inventories Are Low 

In Texas, Dallas and Houston have very low housing inventory increases and a good employment picture. Prices are increasing there. Families are buying homes. Investors are scouting out the area and buying, too. This has created a situation that is very helpful to sellers, which is somewhat ironic given that Texas generally missed out on the housing boom of the last six years. 

What’s Going On In Your Market 

How do you figure out what the market is like in your area? Read the local news paper. Are there “price reduced” or “buy now before the next price increase” phrases in ads for homes being sold? Are there stories about lay-offs or about new employers coming to town? Call your local builders’ association, realtors’ association, Chamber of Commerce. Ask lots of questions about the number of unsold houses today as compared with the number a year ago. Ask the Chamber of Commerce about employers coming to town or leaving. Visit models in new communities and ask lots of questions there, too.

You will soon have your own opinion about what is going on in the part of the country in which you want to buy or sell. Your strategy needs to be adjusted to the strength of your position as a buyer or seller. Understanding the market you will be dealing in is a good place to start.

Contact Lisa Jones and get a better understanding of how your property can benefit from above.

17 7 / 2012

Just because you have a contract does not mean a real estatedeal will always go through as expected.  There are many things to look out for when it comes to contingency clauses in contracts.  These were, at one time, called weasel clauses.  The reason for this was because a buyer or seller could weasel out of a deal because of one contingency or another. 

There are many contingency clauses in place now to protect both the buyer and the seller.  Here are some of the more common ones being used in the real estate market today. 

1)      Loan contingency.  If the buyer can not get funding in a certain amount of time he or she can back out of the deal.

2)      Sale of another home contingency.  The buyer has made an offer but it is contingent upon whether the home he now has will sell.  If it does not sell within a set time, the buyer is not held accountable for the purchase offer.

3)      Home inspection.  The sale is contingent on whether the property will pass the home inspection. The buyer has the right to inspect the home for any unforeseen damage which may not have been disclosed.

4)      Appraisal.  If the property does not meet the appraisal guidelines set forth by the lender, the buyer does not have to uphold his end of the purchase agreement.

5)      Lead based paint inspection.  When a home has been built prior to 1978, the buyer can have a lead base paint inspection.  If there is evidence of lead based paint, this lets the buyer out of the contract.  The house would be considered hazardous.

6)      Water inspection.  Many times the home is in a rural area where there is no access to city water. The supply is by a well. The well must be inspected.  If it does not pass a health inspection, the buyer does not have to buy the property.

7)      Wood boring insects.  A termite inspection is mandatory so there is no chance of hidden damage.  Although this is a problem which can easily be rectified, many buyers will not buy a home which has had evidence of termites.

8)      Hazardous material contingency.  This is similar to the lead paint inspection.  During the home inspection, the contractor may come into contact with black mold or asbestos.  Unless there is an agreement between the buyer and seller to have this taken care of the buyer can walk away from the deal.

9)      Owners association acceptance. In some condos and town houses, the buyer must qualify for the home owners association.  If they do not get accepted, they will be allowed to back out of the deal.

10)  Title report.  The title report will let the parties know about any liens, encumbrances, or easements on the property.  If these are not acceptable to the buyer, they can walk away and not be held accountable.  Something simple like the seller forgetting to mention the oil company holds the mineral rights to the property and can drill anywhere it wants, may make a buyer think twice about buying the property.

 These are just some of the many contingencies which can be listed in a purchase agreement.  It is up to the buyer and seller to work out as many of them as they can to seal the deal.  Sometimes this just does not happen.  Each party must then move on to the next house or buyer.

Contact Lisa Jones and get a better understanding of how your property can benefit from above.

 

13 7 / 2012

First time home buyers, and sellers, can become overwhelmed with all the legal aspects of buying or selling a house.  The paperwork can make anyone’s head swim.  It is extremely easy to familiarize yourself with the real estate contracts with some simple research. 

The first contract you may run into as the seller is the listing agreement.  This is the real estate contract you will sign with the agent who is going to put your house on the market.  This agreement will state the name, address, and other important information about the seller and the property.  It will also list the terms of the listing.  For instance, how much the brokerage is charging for their services, how much you are selling the house for, how long the house will stay with the broker, and what is included in the sale. 

You will also see a lead paint disclosure form if your home was built before 1978. This form simply states when the home was built and that the seller either does or does not have documentation or information pertaining to the lead paint.  If there is documentation, the seller is required to turn it over for inspection.  If there is no known documentation, the buyer has a certain amount of time to have a risk assessment done to see if a hazardous condition exists. 

Along with the lead paint disclosure is the seller’s disclosure.  This is the form which allows the seller to tell about the property.  For instance, if the property is in good repair this can be stated.  The seller is responsible for releasing information on any damage which may have occurred due to flooding or other problems.  If there was an infestation of any kind which had to be professionally treated, the seller will put it on this form. 

The seller will also see another form the real estate agent must present.  This is the agency disclosure form. This is the form which states the agent is working for the seller.  It is important to have this one because some agents work for the buyer, while others are dual agents who work for both.  The seller needs to know who his agent is working for. 

The buyer has an entirely different set of real estate contracts they will encounter.  The mortgage contract will be used to determine the loan amount for purchasing the property.  This will list the details of the purchase.  It will tell how much the buyer will put up and how much the lender will contribute.  There will also be an appraisal done so the property can be properly assessed. 

The purchase agreement is a contract both the buyer and seller will be using.  This is the form the buyer will use to make an offer on the property.  This will also include the amount the buyer is borrowing, any closing costs they are asking the seller to pay, and the amount of earnest money put down.  The purchase agreement will also list what else the buyer would like.  For instance, the window treatments or appliances may be requested in the purchase of the home. 

One of the last forms both parties will see is the title disclosure.  This is the paperwork which states the title is free and clear from all encumbrances.  It also states the seller is the property holder and is allowed to sell the home. 

One final contract is the mortgage paperwork at closing.  This is where the title will change hands, the money will exchange hands, and the property now belongs to the new buyer.

Contact Lisa Jones and get a better understanding of how your property can benefit from above.

11 7 / 2012

Every one dreads moving.  Even if you are moving into the dream home you have pictured all your life, the move is still a pain.  Changing over the utilities, forwarding the mail, notifying creditors, and the packing can all be one big hassle.  With a mover’s checklist you can make the process quite a bit easier. 

One month before the move:

Whether you are moving across town or across the country there are certain things you must do.  The first one is to take an inventory of what you own.  You will need to decide what you are going to keep and what can be donated to local charity or sold at a garage sale.  It is easiest to do this on a room by room basis.  Go through each room and box up what you will not be taking with you to the new house.  If you are donating to the charity call to arrange a pick up time.  If you are having a garage sale, plan it for the next weekend.

For parents with school age children, if there will be a change in schools, notify both the old school and the new one so that transcripts can be sent ahead.  This will make it easier to sign the kids into the new school.

Locate the new pharmacy and have your prescriptions transferred. 

Contact the utility companies to make arrangements for disconnecting and/or transferring to the new address.  You will want to contact the new companies to have the utilities turned on the day you arrive in your new home.

Draw out your new floor plan.  This will enable you to know which pieces of furniture will go where in the new house.  You can also determine what will fit and what will not.

Notify the post office with an address change card they provide.  The kit the U.S. Postal Service has will allow you to notify friends, family, and creditors about the new address.

Talk with your bank to have them change the address on your accounts and credit cards. 

Three weeks before the move:

Start using cleaning supplies and foods you will not want to move.  Downsizing the kitchen can be easy during a move. It can be a hassle to move if you do not do this.

Start packing uncommon items you do not use that often.  Labeling the boxes for the new house make it easier to unpack and get settled in.  Many times it is easier to start with things like the off season clothes.

Retrieve items out on loan.  Get any items in the repair shop out.  Make sure all dry cleaning has been picked up.

Notify the newspaper of any cancellations.

Now is when you want to have that garage sale. 

Two weeks before the move:

If you are using professional movers, find an alternative way to move your pets and plants.  These are things the movers can not take on the truck.

Pack as much of the home up as you can.  Remembering to check the attic and basement for stored seasonal items.

Have a moving folder.  This is where you would keep important items you do not want to get lost or misplaced during the move.  Insurance cards, birth certificates, titles, and other things can go in this folder.  Put it someplace safe.

Walk around the outside of the house to make sure you got everything you are taking.  The garden hose, the wind chimes, and even the lawn ornaments can sometimes be left behind without thinking. 

The week before the move:

Pack up anything else you possibly can.

Double check to make sure the utilities will be taken care of and you know what is happening with any deposits you are owed.

Order the new paper delivery service at the new house. 

The day of the move:

Pack up everything you have not gotten to at this point.

When the entire house is empty, do a complete walk through checking closets and drawers as you go.  Make sure to look in the basement and garage as well.  Close each door before you walk out of  the room.  There have been many things left behind doors. 

This is just a small checklist of some of the things you will want to do before you move.  There are other things you may put on your mover’s checklist.

Contact Lisa Jones and get a better understanding of how your property can benefit from above.

 

08 7 / 2012

Everyone gets excited when they are about to move.  It can be a fun and tiring experience all at the same time.  There are certain things you should do to ensure you have a safe move. 

The first thing you need to do is determine what day you are going to be moving.  The people who should know about it are the ones who will be helping you move.  Many times you will have people you only know as distant acquaintances show up to help with the big day.  The best response is to let them know you have enough people already.  Thank them for the offer and send them on their way.  You may think everyone can be trusted, but this is not the case.  Moving is a hard job and very few people volunteer just to be nice.  The ones who did offer are your friends and family.  It goes without saying they will expect the same from you one day.  Taking help from someone you hardly know can lead to things missing when you start to unpack. 

You will also want to make sure you have the proper moving equipment when you are moving.  Things like a cart dolly or two wheeled truck, as they are sometimes called, will be needed to move heavy things like the refrigerator, freezer, washer, and dryer.  Even if you have ten men ready and willing, you do not want someone hurting themselves because of your move. 

Before everyone arrives to help with the move, make sure every thing is packed up, or at least almost every thing.  This will ensure no one is standing around waiting to grab a box.  Having every thing ready to go and waiting on them will make the entire process so much easier for everyone. 

You will want to make sure the walk ways and stair ways are completely cleared.  You do not want anyone tripping and falling.  This is something which should be done periodically throughout the day to keep everyone safe.  People will ask for help from someone carrying a box down the steps. The person will put the box on the steps and help with what ever needs done, completely forgetting about the box.  The next thing you know someone is coming down with a chair or another box and does not see the first one.  Accidents happen like this all the time. 

It is advisable to have a cooler located somewhere which has a supply of ice and cold water in it. This is especially good if you are moving during the summer months.  People will get extremely hot during the moving process.  You want to keep everyone safe by keeping them hydrated. 

One last tip when it comes to having a safe moving experience.  Keep the doors and windows locked.  There are two reasons for this.  The first is obvious.  You do not want any unwanted guests helping themselves to what ever has been moved or still needs moved.  The other is the weather factor.  It never fails that when you are in one house, it will be raining at the other or vice versa.  You can keep floors dry and slip proof by keeping the windows shut when you leave one house for the other. 

You can also divide your help into teams.  Locate one in the new house and keep the other one at the old house.  As the trucks show up to the new place, the second team can unload. This gives the first team a needed break.  When the first team comes back to load up again, the second team is taking their break.  They can also help start to unpack.  

You can have a safe, enjoyable day of moving if you just follow the hints and tips suggested here. 

Contact Lisa Jones and get a better understanding of how your property can benefit from above.